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Almost daily roxi use for years. No physical dependence
  1. #1
    Ybdta is offline New Member
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    Default Almost daily roxi use for years. No physical dependence

    Obviously I'm new to this forum but heavily experienced in experimenting with many different substances. Long story short, I've takin anywhere from 1-3 30mg roxis a day, maybe not everyday I skip a few days here and there. I have definitely gained a tolerance but not a physical dependence. I've been trying to find as much info on addiction as possible with no luck to any of my questions. Can addiction have anything to do with ones metabolism?

    Also before I started the roxi I was taking Xanax almost on the daily for years and I never experienced any type of withdrawals.

    Anyone else have similar experiences?

  2. #2
    cetateii is offline New Member
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    Default The Biochemistry of the Minority

    Quote Originally Posted by Ybdta View Post
    Obviously I'm new to this forum but heavily experienced in experimenting with many different substances. Long story short, I've takin anywhere from 1-3 30mg roxis a day, maybe not everyday I skip a few days here and there. I have definitely gained a tolerance but not a physical dependence. I've been trying to find as much info on addiction as possible with no luck to any of my questions. Can addiction have anything to do with ones metabolism?

    Also before I started the roxi I was taking Xanax almost on the daily for years and I never experienced any type of withdrawals.

    Anyone else have similar experiences?
    The short answer to your specific question "Can addiction have anything to do with ones metabolism?" is unequivocally yes -- your metabolism has EVERYTHING to do with your response.
    Though humans share a core common biochemistry, it doesn't take much research into experimental science, clinical trials, and anecdotal testimonies to determine that each individual is one-of-a-kind. In the case of dependency, there are traditionally two types recognized -- physical, where tolerance is built and receptors proliferate, such that removing the substance leaves "raw" receptors shrieking for something to hang onto (bind with); and psychological, where the symptoms are cravings and seeking behavior without regard to consequences, and are often thought of as mental or emotional. In reality, these are the same thing with two pathways and manifestations -- both are 100% biochemical and both are "all in your head" -- after all, where else could it be? You brain (which gives rise to the mind) is the only organ you have to represent, experience, and evaluate your feelings and the input from your senses. (If you doubt this practical equivalence, and you're a normal opiate taker, just let yourself get into withdrawal for two days. You'll feel both withdrawal effects, supposedly one physical and one psychological. But then, just take your opiate again, and BOTH sets of symptoms will vanish. You didn't get counseling, group therapy, or change your lifestyle for your "addiction", you just ingested a PHYSICAL chemical that affected your neuroreceptors, and your PSYCHOLOGICAL cravings disappeared.)
    In your case, there are two primary reasons for not developing dependence. One is well-established -- if you take only just enough opioid for actual pain and not for the "goody" feelings, then your brain will likely not proliferate receptors and won't tend toward tolerance and dependency. The second is a genetic link where some individuals have unusual kappa opiate receptor chemistry involving dynorphin that is extra-protective against euphoria and addiction.
    The first didn't apply to me because my pain doc started me on 8mg of Suboxone (off-label) which was WAY more than I needed for pain relief, so I developed a strong physical dependency that has taken me years to taper (with great discomfort) and finally eliminate. The second did apply however. I've never been drunk or high, and indeed believe that both are impossible for me. I had a one-time chance with a PCA device after surgery to do an experiment. I was in little pain, but I pumped the machine until empty to see if I got an effect, which my friends had described as "floating on a cloud", "pleasantly drowsy", "peaceful", and "euphoric". I felt absolutely no effect except the pain relief -- it didn't make me sleepy, make me happy, slow my reflexes (which I tested with an app on my laptop), or lower my scores with a Scrabble game application. There was a confirmation later where I had another surgery and was given some IV opiate before surgery, but I stayed alert through the prep procedure until propafol was administered.

  3. #3
    LauraPalmer is offline New Member
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    Default

    Hi...new member, I was diagnosed with Wilson's Disease last year, and before that was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, which my neurologist says is probably a symptom of my WD since this disease messes with everything in one's body...also my stomach problems and issues with my reproductive system. Last spring, before I was diagnosed with this rare disease, I was already in pain but I can't take ibuprofen or naproxen because they give me ulcers. I almost died from the internal bleeding. Because I have blood disorders I cannot take pain meds that thin the blood like aspirin/acetaminophen. And Tramadol didn't agree with me one bit (massive headaches, constipation, and shakiness). I had >>>>>> insurance and no pain management doc would take it and no other doctor would prescribe it for me, so I had to get them from my father for a while. That started a bit over a couple years ago, and I was steady on 10mg for a while (unless the pain was unbearable). Well, last year my father came down with double pneumonia and I ran out of pills for about two weeks. Despite the pain (which wasn't nearly as bad as it is now) I didn't have much withdrawal at all. Since then I've had to up my dosage to 20mg which I don't find that bad, considering I was taking 10mg for a long time. I have since found a wonderful and compassionate doctor who is now prescribing the oxy for me--15 mg and works well because they're OCs and not OP's. I'll most likely have to enter a rehab facility by the time the pain is almost nonexistent anymore and my disease is regulated, but I don't think it will be nearly as difficult considering my pretty low dosage.

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