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"generic" oxycontin.....
  1. #1
    cooperca is offline New Member
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    Jul 2015
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    Default "generic" oxycontin.....

    Hi. I am new here. I have posted in a few places not knowing how to use this site. I suffer from multiple disk issues. The last 2 months i have gotten the "generic" oxycontin. I have called PERDUE pharma & the pharmacist i talked to was very nice & took the time to answer my questions & discuss my issues. Long story short according to PERDUE no other companies are making a generic oxycontin- PERDUE is making all of the meds, the generic is not really a generic. PERDUE is selling the meds to other pharmaceutical companies that are then re-distributing them to retail pharmacys. There is only a limited supply of the "generic" and once they are gone there will be no more available. So me thinking they do not work the same is all in my head....?
    My question: if you have gotten the generic what do you think?

  2. #2
    PsychiatricEarth is offline New Member
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    Aug 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooperca View Post
    Hi. I am new here. I have posted in a few places not knowing how to use this site. I suffer from multiple disk issues. The last 2 months i have gotten the "generic" oxycontin. I have called PERDUE pharma & the pharmacist i talked to was very nice & took the time to answer my questions & discuss my issues. Long story short according to PERDUE no other companies are making a generic oxycontin- PERDUE is making all of the meds, the generic is not really a generic. PERDUE is selling the meds to other pharmaceutical companies that are then re-distributing them to retail pharmacys. There is only a limited supply of the "generic" and once they are gone there will be no more available. So me thinking they do not work the same is all in my head....?
    My question: if you have gotten the generic what do you think?
    A brand-name drug product is originally discovered and developed by a pharmaceutical company. In order for the company to market and sell their product they must first gain approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) by submitting a New Drug Application. In this documentation the company submits data to establish a drug's clinical safety and efficacy. Other studies determine the characteristics of the drug dosage form, including the manufacturing process, drug stability, purity, strength, and how it dissolves. Once the drug receives FDA approval, the innovator company can then exclusively market and sell this 'brand-name' product for as long as the company has patent protection. A 2000 study published in the Journal of Health Economics estimated that bringing a new drug to market costs the innovator on average $802 million over a period of 10 to 15 years. A patent allows the innovator to sell its product exclusively in order to recoup money spent during development and to generate a profit.

    The difference between a brand-name product and a generic one is designed to be transparent. Once the patent life expires on a brand-name drug product, it is eligible to be made into a "generic drug." To do this, the generic drug manufacturer must ensure that the drug they are producing contains the same active ingredient(s) as the brand-name product, in the same dosage form, at the same dose or concentration, and for the same route of administration (for example, amoxicillin 500 milligram (oral) capsule). The drug may differ in color, shape, taste, inactive ingredients, preservatives and packaging, however. Because of these differences, the generic drug manufacturers are required to submit additional paperwork to the FDA to prove that their product is manufactured in accordance with good manufacturing practices (GMPs), and is as pure and stable as the brand-name product. Additionally, the generic needs to meet pharmacokinetic parameters in the body, which means it must dissolve (in a beaker) at the same rate and to the same extent as the original. This process ensures that the two products are bioequivalent because if product A and product B dissolve in a virtually identical manner, then they should behave the same in the body.

    Thus, a drug that contains the same active ingredient, in the same amount, in the same form, dissolving at the same rate in equal amounts may be granted acceptance for substitution for a brand-name product. If it is accepted, the drug can be prescribed no differently than the brand-name product. Once all the equivalency tests have been conducted, the generic drug is considered a therapeutic equivalent. This means that the drug will do the same thing via the same mechanism, and will also follow the same distribution, metabolism and elimination pathways in the body. One publication that lists this sort of information is called the Orange Book. This publication rates generic drugs in accordance with their respective brand-name products and gives the FDA substitution recommendations. The FDA website (www.fda.gov) is also a very good source.

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