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oxycodone and acetaminophen >>. ocycodone hcl
  1. #1
    CindyEli is offline New Member
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    Default oxycodone and acetaminophen >>. ocycodone hcl

    So I severely sprained my ankle to a point where I cannot walk on it and am in extreme pain. I did go to the hospital and they gave my oxycodone with acetaminophen while I was there (the bigger pill). She gave me a script and I received oxycodone hcl (5mg) instead from the pharmacy. It doesn't affect me the same way as the oxycodone with acetaminophen in it. I have tried taking tylenol with my prescription no results.

    1. oxycodone and acetaminophen kind of gives me energy and takes the pain away and makes me feel so much better. (is it percocet?)
    2. oxycodone hcl (mini pill with m on it 05 l 35, is this roxy?) makes me drowsy, groggy and the pain isn't really taken away. I was told it possibly can be time released and might even be stronger.

    BTW I even take less than directed and only use this when I'm in extreme pain.

    Please let me know if there is a chemical difference other than lack of acetaminophin. Or perhaps this is psychological. Thank you.

  2. #2
    ARTIST658 is offline Platinum Member
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    If it's the same strength of oxycodone in it, then the only variable is the acetaminophen. So the difference in pain relief is psychological. Your pursuit of the "gives me energy and makes me feel so much better" aspect of this drug sounds like you're looking for more than simply pain relief. That's risky territory. Even posting the question here raises eyebrows. A sprained ankle does not generally require such a strong medication. I broke both ankles in one accident, and never required oxycodone. Painkillers are dangerous drugs, and all you need right now is enough of the drug to lessen the pain to where it's manageable. It is not essential that ALL pain is removed - nor is it adviseable to be seeking energy or "feeling better" from this drug. This is not a drug to abuse.

    You will know the truth - and only the truth can set you free.

  3. #3
    CindyEli is offline New Member
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    Thanks for the info- it was psychological. But you also have to consider I have scoliosis and also migraines (I never use pain killers for these). Also- I would NEVER abuse the drug- I was taking it as prescribed (actually LESS). The fact that I posted in here is no suspension since drug addicts usually do not post about this info nor do they ask. They KNOW. The feeling happy aspect is simply being without PHYSICAL pain. I'm done with my pills so and do not need them anymore. Seeking for more is a sign- and also the fact that I asked doesn't really indicate abuse. I'm actually going to become a substance abuse counselor ( I have a degree in psychology seems like you have an issue thats too intense for a stranger thats why I hate message boards) and addiction touches base with me. You gotta not spread judgement at all. I could have just asked a doctor and he/she would have answered my question. Pain killer questions are always a touchy subject, I just wanted some advice.

  4. #4
    ARTIST658 is offline Platinum Member
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    Cindy,

    I am a substance abuse counselor - and this is a forum that is predominantly about substance abuse and addiction. So my concerns about addiction are quite understandable - and certainly not cause to 'diagnose' me as having "an issue that's too intense for a stranger."

    Yes, drug addicts most certainly do post about this kind of thing and ask for this kind of advice. If you took the time to read more from this forum, you'd see it right and left. Oftentimes, in this forum, the reasoning behind a post like yours is to find out how to get more of the narcotic to get high - or get more pills from the doctor, period. Your post looked very much like one of those common posts, so I respectfully responded with the concerns I mentioned.

    Generally, a person turns to a pharmacist or MD if all they want is the straight facts about the ingredients in a medication. Else they'd use the medication checker on this site, rather than turn to a message board of laypersons.

    It isn't about spreading judgement in the least! I am a recovering addict (nearly 10 years now) - and I know this disease inside and out. I judge no one for having this disease. It is about spreading the facts and the concerns, which is something I have done on this forum for many years. I have the education and certification behind me, and I work in the field of substance abuse. Addiction and recovery is my area of expertise, and I share what I know freely with others here - to the tune of about 1500 posts thus far.

    I think you were entirely too sensitive, if you read my post as either "judgemental" or requiring of further psycho-analysis... LOL

    God bless,
    Ruth

    You will know the truth - and only the truth can set you free.

  5. #5
    CindyEli is offline New Member
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    Lol this is actually funny (no sarcasm). Understood how it came across with a drug addiction suspicion.

    So on another friendly note! How did you go about the process of become an addiction counselor? Do you have a certificate or a masters? Are you in practice? What kind of job do you have from it? Where is your location and is it at need? I have a degree from NYU (I know I know, I'm not bragging I actually hate NYU) in applied psychology. Wanted to get into social work but really wasn't passionate about social work. I did love working with at risk youth, the stories they told me were so shocking and I dealt with crisis intervention quite well.

    So anyway, any advice would help. I'm currently planning on going to CUNY professional school for a certificate for substance abuse. As I think I know you get the classes and go for the test. Though, I don't know if this would land me a job. I live in NYC and also want to move to Portland, Oregon or Seattle (high demand in drug addiction).

    On another note my girlfriend actually is recovered. So its ironic. If these questions are too much let me know. I don't really check this so if you wish you chat or answer any questions I'll message ya my email.

  6. #6
    ARTIST658 is offline Platinum Member
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    Cindy - The questions are a bit much - I sense I've been put on the witness stand and Perry Mason is trying to make me cave! lol

    My undergraduate degree was in business management. (Boston College) I had worked in management most of my life, until addiction brought me to my knees. I sought out long-term treatment, and returned to school (UMass) over the first few years I was clean. I knew I wanted more meaning to my career, and felt called to work in substance abuse. So I added a degree in social work, took specific courses in substance abuse/substance abuse counseling, took the required tests and became certified as a Certified Substance Abuse Counselor while I was living in Massachusetts. I am now in Maine, and had to be re-certified. Each state has its own requirements - and its own testing. So I can't speak to what you need in NY or Oregon.

    Do you have any history involving substance abuse? I ask because that's a common basis for how most of us get into this field. There is a tremendously high "burn-out" rate in this speciality, simply by nature of the power of this disease. The odds of recovery are stacked tremendously against success. So the day-to-day work requires a vast amount of commitment. If you didn't care for social work - and were shocked by the stories from at-risk youth - I'm doubtful you're prepared for this field!!! [My very first client had been sold by her mother for drugs when she was 8, and later witnessed her father stabbing and killing her mother - if that gives you an idea.]

    I work as an associate in a long-term treatment facility for women. So I am not only involved in the initial detox, but generally 6-12 months of treatment, before they're ready to rebuild a new life - clean and sober. Addicts are a real challenge to deal with on a daily basis - I love them dearly (as I am one!) - but this disease carries a lot of manipulative, immature behaviors and attitudes, and some days, you really get to the end of your rope with it. And you're there for the worst of it with them; their drugs are removed - and they are compelled to deal with the underlying issues (which often include trauma) and feel every ounce of the emotions they used to numb. It's often brutal, but it's also essential.

    I keep my personal email and contact information private. I've taken the chance to tell one or two through this forum, and regret it later - so I hope you understand.

    You will know the truth - and only the truth can set you free.

  7. #7
    CindyEli is offline New Member
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    No substance abuse personally at all- and trust me working with at risk youth was the best time of my life. Trust me, I could handle it. Take care! And hope you don't get "burned out"

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