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Effexor Useful for Hot Flashes
  1. #1
    rusty is offline Junior Member
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    Default Effexor Useful for Hot Flashes

    Antidepressant Useful for Hot Flashes
    Tue Jan 4, 2005 05:58 PM ET

    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The antidepressant venlafaxine (Effexor) appears to be effective in treating postmenopausal hot flashes in otherwise healthy women, according to a report in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.
    Previous studies have confirmed the value of venlafaxine in treating hot flashes in women with breast cancer and those reluctant to use estrogen because of breast cancer fears, the authors explain.

    In this study, Dr. Robert B. Jaffe and colleagues from University of California, San Francisco, investigated whether extended-release venlafaxine would reduce hot flashes in a general population of postmenopausal women. Eighty women were randomly treated with either venlafaxine or inactive "placebo."

    Women in the venlafaxine group reported higher hot flash scores when the study began, the researchers note, but their scores declined to the level of the control group at one-month follow-up.

    By the time the 12-week study was completed, the authors report, women in the venlafaxine group had substantially lower hot flash scores than did women in the placebo group.

    When they occurred, the hot flashes were not, on average, significantly less severe in the venlafaxine group, the results indicate.

    Venlafaxine treatment was associated with significant improvement in mental health and vitality compared with placebo, the investigators report, but there was evidence that venlafaxine adversely affected sexual function in some women.

    "Although several adverse effects were noted in the venlafaxine group," the researchers write, "most women...continued treatment beyond the conclusion of the study, suggesting that the benefits of treatment outweighed the discomfort of the adverse effects."

    "This study indicates that extended-release venlafaxine is an effective treatment option for postmenopausal" hot flashes, the authors conclude.

    SOURCE: Obstetrics and Gynecology, January 2005.

  2. #2
    gramatt is offline New Member
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    quote:Originally posted by rusty

    Antidepressant Useful for Hot Flashes
    Tue Jan 4, 2005 05:58 PM ET

    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The antidepressant venlafaxine (Effexor) appears to be effective in treating postmenopausal hot flashes in otherwise healthy women, according to a report in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.
    Previous studies have confirmed the value of venlafaxine in treating hot flashes in women with breast cancer and those reluctant to use estrogen because of breast cancer fears, the authors explain.

    In this study, Dr. Robert B. Jaffe and colleagues from University of California, San Francisco, investigated whether extended-release venlafaxine would reduce hot flashes in a general population of postmenopausal women. Eighty women were randomly treated with either venlafaxine or inactive "placebo."

    Women in the venlafaxine group reported higher hot flash scores when the study began, the researchers note, but their scores declined to the level of the control group at one-month follow-up.

    By the time the 12-week study was completed, the authors report, women in the venlafaxine group had substantially lower hot flash scores than did women in the placebo group.

    When they occurred, the hot flashes were not, on average, significantly less severe in the venlafaxine group, the results indicate.

    Venlafaxine treatment was associated with significant improvement in mental health and vitality compared with placebo, the investigators report, but there was evidence that venlafaxine adversely affected sexual function in some women.

    "Although several adverse effects were noted in the venlafaxine group," the researchers write, "most women...continued treatment beyond the conclusion of the study, suggesting that the benefits of treatment outweighed the discomfort of the adverse effects."

    "This study indicates that extended-release venlafaxine is an effective treatment option for postmenopausal" hot flashes, the authors conclude.

    SOURCE: Obstetrics and Gynecology, January 2005.

  3. #3
    gramatt is offline New Member
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    Obiviously the studies on the treatment of HOT FLASHES with EFFEXOR failed to advise women of the HORRIFIC side effects that come with taking the EFFEXOR and also the HORRIFIC side effects of getting off of EFFEXOR.....talk to a competent Dr. before you take EFFEXOR and make sure you also go over all the side effects. I have been taking EFFEXOR for 1 year....for HOT FLASHES. Side effects include SEVERE nose bleeds, stiff and cramping muscles, 30 to 35 lb. weight gain in less than a year....I have never been overweight,never had leg cramps, stiff muscles, or the nose bleeds until I started taking EFFEXOR - taking 150 mg daily. Also, tried to get off, weaning myself to half a dose, not working. Severe "BRAIN SHIVERS" or "BRAIN TRMEORS", sever hives, severe nausea, very sick......the most horrific headaches I have ever experienced. I am or was an extremely healthy 57 year old woman who just needed something for the hot flashes, which by the way, after a while, the EFFEXOR caused profuse sweating.....I will see a Dr. on Jan 8, 2007 to help me get off this stuff. This is the most horrible, sickening medication I have ever been on. Something must be done to warn anyone who is going to start this medication. It is very, very, dangerous....
    please reconsider before you take it. Speak very openly with your Doctor before you make a decision.



    quote:Originally posted by rusty

    Antidepressant Useful for Hot Flashes
    Tue Jan 4, 2005 05:58 PM ET

    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The antidepressant venlafaxine (Effexor) appears to be effective in treating postmenopausal hot flashes in otherwise healthy women, according to a report in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.
    Previous studies have confirmed the value of venlafaxine in treating hot flashes in women with breast cancer and those reluctant to use estrogen because of breast cancer fears, the authors explain.

    In this study, Dr. Robert B. Jaffe and colleagues from University of California, San Francisco, investigated whether extended-release venlafaxine would reduce hot flashes in a general population of postmenopausal women. Eighty women were randomly treated with either venlafaxine or inactive "placebo."

    Women in the venlafaxine group reported higher hot flash scores when the study began, the researchers note, but their scores declined to the level of the control group at one-month follow-up.

    By the time the 12-week study was completed, the authors report, women in the venlafaxine group had substantially lower hot flash scores than did women in the placebo group.

    When they occurred, the hot flashes were not, on average, significantly less severe in the venlafaxine group, the results indicate.

    Venlafaxine treatment was associated with significant improvement in mental health and vitality compared with placebo, the investigators report, but there was evidence that venlafaxine adversely affected sexual function in some women.

    "Although several adverse effects were noted in the venlafaxine group," the researchers write, "most women...continued treatment beyond the conclusion of the study, suggesting that the benefits of treatment outweighed the discomfort of the adverse effects."

    "This study indicates that extended-release venlafaxine is an effective treatment option for postmenopausal" hot flashes, the authors conclude.

    SOURCE: Obstetrics and Gynecology, January 2005.

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