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Norco quit 4th time hopefully last - help / advice please
  1. #1
    Jelm6 is offline Member
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    Default Norco quit 4th time hopefully last - help / advice please

    I posted yesterday and it never went up for some reason. Been on norco for 6 years on and off, mostly on, for an injury in my neck and allergies to many other meds. Tried other solutions but ended up stuck here. My doc would love for me to stop and suggested trying cold turkey and taking some time off to just do it but he and I have tried so many other meds and treatments and surgery consultations that he felt this was the least invasive. My neck pain seems to be getting better to the point of tolerating it. I need this out of my life. I need my complete life back.

    Saturday night was my last dose of 4 x 5/325. Cold turkey since. Cravings at the times I would take yesterday. I’m a father and husband and 45 years old. Tried quitting 3 other times and didn’t stick which is why I need this forum. I’ve always tried to do it alone.

    Yesterday I also gave my wife the rest of my pills. Had a good day until 6:30 (24 hour mark) then chills, headache, general exhaustion.

    Woke up this morning ok not great. I took this week off with my boss last week so please, any advice t get over the hurdle once and for all would be appreciated.

    Thank you
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  2. #2
    asp44 is offline Member
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    Welcome and congratulations on deciding to quit. As you know this is going to be a battle. But you sound like you are ready to end your affair with these nasty things. For me the rls was always the worse symptom by far, & there was no relief from it except for the time i spent in a HOTTTT bath. For the first 6 days i literally spent half of each day just soaking.
    The insomnia was a close second! I couldn't sleep at all for the first week. I tried and tried to get a hour of sleep here & there but to no avail. After about 10 days I would finally get about 3 hours a night. It is returning to normal just way to slow for my liking.
    I was taking about 150-200 mg of oxy for about 15 years. So i knew it would be an uphill battle stopping ct. But it is possible.
    Get rid of those pills if you have any left!! Or you are just basically waiting for a relapse to happen. Stay busy and stay hydrated. Best of luck
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  3. #3
    Catrina is offline Diamond Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jelm6 View Post
    I posted yesterday and it never went up for some reason. Been on norco for 6 years on and off, mostly on, for an injury in my neck and allergies to many other meds. Tried other solutions but ended up stuck here. My doc would love for me to stop and suggested trying cold turkey and taking some time off to just do it but he and I have tried so many other meds and treatments and surgery consultations that he felt this was the least invasive. My neck pain seems to be getting better to the point of tolerating it. I need this out of my life. I need my complete life back.

    Saturday night was my last dose of 4 x 5/325. Cold turkey since. Cravings at the times I would take yesterday. I’m a father and husband and 45 years old. Tried quitting 3 other times and didn’t stick which is why I need this forum. I’ve always tried to do it alone.

    Yesterday I also gave my wife the rest of my pills. Had a good day until 6:30 (24 hour mark) then chills, headache, general exhaustion.

    Woke up this morning ok not great. I took this week off with my boss last week so please, any advice t get over the hurdle once and for all would be appreciated.

    Thank you
    Welcome!

    How many mg of Norco were you taking per day? Telling us that will help us predict what you've got in store for you.

    Giving your wife the rest of your pills was a good, smart move. I'd go one step further and get rid of them entirely. When things get rough, it's too easy to take "just one" to get a break from the symptoms but that'll just set you back and it's not worth it.

    The timeline for cold turkey from short acting opiates, like Norco is fairly predictable. My Day 1 was hardly a bother, just some anxiety waiting and watching for the symptoms to begin. I was just like you. The symptoms began to kick into gear around the 24 hour mark and peaked in the next 8 hours. From there, they'll remain consistent for the next four days or so. You can expect aches, diarrhea, restless legs, and trouble sleeping. Lots of hot baths and heating pads set on low will help with the aches and the RLS. Immodium for the bathroom issues. Take it as directed on the package and it will help a lot. Be sure to drink plenty of fluids.
    Anything will do but avoid caffeine and vitamin fortified water or Gatorade helps to replace the electrolytes you're losing with the bathroom issues and sweating as well as to keep you hydrated. Allowing yourself to become dehydrated will worsen all of your symptoms and it has a set of its own symptoms that mimic detox symptoms. Be sure to eat as well as possible. Protein shakes are a good idea. I used almond milk, half of banana, berries, raw honey, protein powder and ice cubes. Toss that all into a blender and you'll have a healthy meal rich in protein. Move around as much as you can. It doesn't have to be a five mile run, frequent short walks, chores around the house, anything so long as you're not wallowing in bed. Find things to occupy your mind. Movies, books, anything. Try to get up and take a five or ten minute walk at least once an hour even if it's just walking around the yard.

    Sleep can be a bear but don't let it frustrate you. Expect it and don't fight it. You can try Melatonin or Valerian Root washed down with a strong cup of Sleepy Time Tea at bedtime. Even if it doesn't induce sleep, it might help to relax you. Don't toss and turn. I'd give myself 10 or 15 minutes to fall asleep and if it wasn't happening, I'd get up and find something to do. Have you found and read the Thomas Recipe? It's a list of vitamins and supplements that might help your detox symptoms. The recipe does include benzos but don't take those unless you have already been taking them. They're dangerously addictive and much harder to get off of so it's not worth taking that chance.

    Around Day 5, the aches and RLS should disappear abruptly and you'll be left feeling like you're getting over the flu. Weak and tired. Diarrhea and trouble with sleep is going to hang around for a while longer but you should at that point be mostly comfortable. However, let the mind games begin!! This is when the cravings will begin to set in and the desperation to have a day that you'll feel well and energetic can become a kind of obsession. "Just one pill!" Yeah. Don't do it because even one is going to stall your recovery if not send you right back to daily use. Even though you'll be tired and lethargic, do your best to get back to your daily routines. After those first five days, you should be able to get back to work and that's one of the best things you'll be able to do.

    This is totally doable. Believe me it is. Be stubborn and know that it ALWAYS gets better. ALWAYS! Good luck and keep posting. It helps to pass the time and you'll get advice and support which really helps. Have you considered meetings? Something to think about.

    Peace,

    Cat
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    Jelm6 is offline Member
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    Ok just fell back to sleep and woke up to find your response. First off, THANK YOU. I was on a pretty low dose of 3 5/325’s for most of the 6 years. I tried weaning off a couple of months ago and fell and broke my ribs to which the only solution was a prescription for more. I declined the prescription since I had gotten it down to 1.5-2 a day and the pain was so unbearable that instead of reducing I actually went up to 4 a day.

    Yes I know of the Thomas recipe. I have b12 and b6 and because I am allergic to many things I am hesitant to try the other stuff. I also do have a natural multivitamin I take and c. I also have 1mg pills of lorazepam from my doc to help with the sleep. Right now I am about to take a hot shower and head to the store and get some of your suggestions which will also count as something to do.

    My greatest fear lies in your last comments. Just one pill. This is where I’ve failed every time in the past. Every time. My wife has already thrown out what I gave her so I took your advice there. I just know myself and know that this time is different as I have taken greater steps but it scares the >>>> out of me when I feel like I’m being taken over by the devil on my shoulder.
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  5. #5
    Jelm6 is offline Member
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    Thank you so much for this response. I AM READY. Never have I gotten rid of the pills, posted to a forum, taken time off. I am also terrified. Not that I can’t do it. I’m worried that I won’t see i5 all the way through. How long before I am not craving the norco either physically or psychologically would you guess?

  6. #6
    Svetochek is offline Junior Member
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    It really depends on each individual, the dosage you have been taking and for how long. Staying sober is actually a life style to my opinion. I've stopped drinking about 3 years ago and haven't had even a single sip all these years. Like any other addiction you will have to change your way of thinking with these pills. I'm not perfect myself... I'm trying to stop taking suboxone, medication which supposed to be used to help people who are addicted to opioids. My advice to you, please try to get off whatever you are currently on without involvement of suboxone. It's very difficult to get off and honestly I'd rather deal with hydrocodone withdrawals than suboxone withdrawals. At lease you will be done with major withdrawals within a week or so and will just have to deal with staying sober.
    Hang in there!!!
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  7. #7
    Jelm6 is offline Member
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    Thank you for your personal story and for the advice. I am not going to try suboxone. I just need more mental support than I've ever had in the past. My previous attempts, I believe, failed because I wasn't 'all-in' on quitting. I would still keep the pills in the house. I would even have refils filled but plan to not take them. I would do it totally alone. And I failed 3 times.

    I appreciate your advice and this forum. I just got back from the grocery - fruit, protein, gatorade, etc, and getting out of the house for am hour. I'm honestly convinced I can get over the hurdle physically.

    I am sincerely nervous about your suggestion "change your thinking" and the mental hunger for the pills later down the road. Congrats on your accomplishment with alcohol - it is an inspiration. If you have any further advice on how you changed your thinking I would genuinely appreciate it.
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  8. #8
    Jelm6 is offline Member
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    Cat -

    I wanted to personally thank you again and I actually followed a lot of your advice immediately.

    I had 2 more prescriptions for refills - one was good this Saturday. As a sign of conviction I actually burned them on my journal video so at this point I have zero access to any pills. They are gone.

    I am scared and nervous as hell. In some way I feel like I have lost the true person that I am and I've been someone hiding behind a dirty window for the past 6 years. I am excited to finally feel like the real me again but I am terrified about the emotional road to get there.






    Quote Originally Posted by Catrina View Post
    Welcome!

    How many mg of Norco were you taking per day? Telling us that will help us predict what you've got in store for you.

    Giving your wife the rest of your pills was a good, smart move. I'd go one step further and get rid of them entirely. When things get rough, it's too easy to take "just one" to get a break from the symptoms but that'll just set you back and it's not worth it.

    The timeline for cold turkey from short acting opiates, like Norco is fairly predictable. My Day 1 was hardly a bother, just some anxiety waiting and watching for the symptoms to begin. I was just like you. The symptoms began to kick into gear around the 24 hour mark and peaked in the next 8 hours. From there, they'll remain consistent for the next four days or so. You can expect aches, diarrhea, restless legs, and trouble sleeping. Lots of hot baths and heating pads set on low will help with the aches and the RLS. Immodium for the bathroom issues. Take it as directed on the package and it will help a lot. Be sure to drink plenty of fluids.
    Anything will do but avoid caffeine and vitamin fortified water or Gatorade helps to replace the electrolytes you're losing with the bathroom issues and sweating as well as to keep you hydrated. Allowing yourself to become dehydrated will worsen all of your symptoms and it has a set of its own symptoms that mimic detox symptoms. Be sure to eat as well as possible. Protein shakes are a good idea. I used almond milk, half of banana, berries, raw honey, protein powder and ice cubes. Toss that all into a blender and you'll have a healthy meal rich in protein. Move around as much as you can. It doesn't have to be a five mile run, frequent short walks, chores around the house, anything so long as you're not wallowing in bed. Find things to occupy your mind. Movies, books, anything. Try to get up and take a five or ten minute walk at least once an hour even if it's just walking around the yard.

    Sleep can be a bear but don't let it frustrate you. Expect it and don't fight it. You can try Melatonin or Valerian Root washed down with a strong cup of Sleepy Time Tea at bedtime. Even if it doesn't induce sleep, it might help to relax you. Don't toss and turn. I'd give myself 10 or 15 minutes to fall asleep and if it wasn't happening, I'd get up and find something to do. Have you found and read the Thomas Recipe? It's a list of vitamins and supplements that might help your detox symptoms. The recipe does include benzos but don't take those unless you have already been taking them. They're dangerously addictive and much harder to get off of so it's not worth taking that chance.

    Around Day 5, the aches and RLS should disappear abruptly and you'll be left feeling like you're getting over the flu. Weak and tired. Diarrhea and trouble with sleep is going to hang around for a while longer but you should at that point be mostly comfortable. However, let the mind games begin!! This is when the cravings will begin to set in and the desperation to have a day that you'll feel well and energetic can become a kind of obsession. "Just one pill!" Yeah. Don't do it because even one is going to stall your recovery if not send you right back to daily use. Even though you'll be tired and lethargic, do your best to get back to your daily routines. After those first five days, you should be able to get back to work and that's one of the best things you'll be able to do.

    This is totally doable. Believe me it is. Be stubborn and know that it ALWAYS gets better. ALWAYS! Good luck and keep posting. It helps to pass the time and you'll get advice and support which really helps. Have you considered meetings? Something to think about.

    Peace,

    Cat
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    Jelm6 is offline Member
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    On hour 44 and just ate protein, banana, b12, b6, c, and feel terrible. This is around the time I would take a dose. I am craving but also feeling some cold sweats. Any mental advice would be greatly apprecited. Any help on how you got through this part? Thanks in advance.
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    asp44 is offline Member
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    Cold then hot!! I think everybody who has quit opiates have had issues with fluctuating chills & sweats. Thankfully for me this usually quit on day 3 for the most part. Hang in there it will get better each day. 44 hour's is great. 2-3 more days of acute symptoms, then things will slowly improve. Dont get discouraged you are doing great.

  11. #11
    Catrina is offline Diamond Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jelm6 View Post
    On hour 44 and just ate protein, banana, b12, b6, c, and feel terrible. This is around the time I would take a dose. I am craving but also feeling some cold sweats. Any mental advice would be greatly apprecited. Any help on how you got through this part? Thanks in advance.
    Hello again. I LOVE your commitment and I just know you've got this. I can tell.

    To answer this question about how to get thru the emotional/mental part....ONE. MINUTE. AT. A. TIME!! Seriously. Don't watch the clocks. Almost impossible, I know but it makes things worse. Don't be scared, be excited! This is your chance for a total do-over. I have survived countless and I really do mean countless cold turkey detoxes and I mostly survived that first week of the physical stuff. The truth is looking back at it is that I wasn't ready. I had quit for all of the wrong reasons. I ran out of pills. My family. Oh my family--what I put them through. The one and only time I faced my Day One with excitement for what I could do and what I could be living clean and sober was my last Day One almost eight years ago. I had abused pain killers in mega doses for nearly twenty years. I didn't even know who I was anymore nor could I remember what it was like to live clean and sober. I had no idea how I would make it but I was determined to figure it out. Obviously I did.

    The single most important thing I had to do was to forgive myself and find a way to rediscover my self esteem. Totally by accident, I discovered that random acts of kindness just made me feel good. Begin to take pride in every single good thing, every single responsible thing that you do. Do you have kids? Hug them. Tell them you love them. Do something nice for your wife unexpectedly. Smile at strangers and say good morning. It sounds hokey but these are the things that will give you a little instant gratification and the more you do, the more you'll want to do. This is an awesome addiction!

    Early on, I would set small goals for myself. I'd tell myself that I absolutely would not consider trying to get a pill for an hour. Then it would turn into "until noon", then "until tomorrow". Rinse and repeat. When I went to bed at night, I would be thankful that the day was done and I had made it., It felt so good to finally be able to lay my head on my pillow and know that I had done the right thing. In the morning, I'd take my shower and take a good long look at my eyes. Clear, blue and sparkling and I'd recall what they looked like when I was using. I don't ever want to look into those addict eyes again. It turns out that it's mostly the small things that get us through the day.

    Finally, NO! These cravings will not last forever and in fact, in the scheme of things they won't last very long at all. I would guess that with only two or three weeks into my recovery, I was already beginning to lose the obsession. By a month or certainly month and a half, those thoughts would pop into my head and would be gone. Soon, it they became no more than a fleeting thought and most times didn't even fully develop.

    If you remember nothing else I say to you, remember this: Do not ever become complacent and begin to think that you can handle one, just this one time. This has to be an all or nothing kinda thing. That sounds a lot worse than it is, by the way. I have had two surgeries, one early in 2016 and another in late May of this year. I have yet another scheduled in two weeks. All back surgeries and all my pain has been treated with Advil or Aleve. I can honestly tell you that never once have I wished I had that one pill. I don't need them and soon you won't either. I don't feel like I've been sentenced and because of my bad choices I can't get pain relief. I get enough relief to make it manageable and I'm perfectly fine. This is not to say that there won't be a time in my future that I will need pain pills again but I don't fret about it. There'll be enough time to worry about that when and if the time comes.

    Keep posting! I'll try to keep checking in on you.

    Peace,

    Cat

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    Jelm6 is offline Member
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    Cat-

    I cannot tell you how grateful I am for your last message. Sharing your story gives me genuine hope. Switching to one minute at a time gives me hope. Thank you so much.

    I just got off the phone with my wife and told her I had burned the prescriptions and she said, “ok”. I said “I thought you’d be more excited or something” to which she said “I never completely understood what it was doing to you inside”. That’s the atrocious problem with being on the lower dose of 15mg for years. It’s terrible because it can be justified as “well it’s only 15mg and so it’s not too bad”. I will tell you first hand that even 15mg puts a wall between you and life. If adds a permanent fog. Yes, the eyes are not the same. The color in my face is not pure. It’s a demon that calls for the 2nd pill then the 3rd. It’s a complete and permanent distraction. I just hid it so well that my wife doesn’t see how badly it was destroying me on the inside. This is actually one of the reasons I relapsed so many times. I am not specifically blaming my w feel it was ultimately my fault, but when you keep thinking “eh just one pill today” and your wife says she doesn’t see the issue with it you said screw it and go for the pill. And that becomes 2. Then back to 3. Ugh... I love her beyond and have been truly happily married for almost 20 years to her, I just can’t get her to understand the mental torture because I suppose my bs everything is fine routine really worked for the past. Any thoughts on what to do in this situation?

    I love your smiling at people suggestion. There was a person with special needs doing the grocery bagging and I could see the person ever seeing everything wanted to make sure I wasn’t getting impatient. I just smiled at both and said thank you and yes it did feel good. In fact I actually thought “I’m not supposed to be feeling good today and that was nice.”

    Thanks for checking in, again, and I truly appreciate the continued advice.









    Quote Originally Posted by Catrina View Post
    Hello again. I LOVE your commitment and I just know you've got this. I can tell.

    To answer this question about how to get thru the emotional/mental part....ONE. MINUTE. AT. A. TIME!! Seriously. Don't watch the clocks. Almost impossible, I know but it makes things worse. Don't be scared, be excited! This is your chance for a total do-over. I have survived countless and I really do mean countless cold turkey detoxes and I mostly survived that first week of the physical stuff. The truth is looking back at it is that I wasn't ready. I had quit for all of the wrong reasons. I ran out of pills. My family. Oh my family--what I put them through. The one and only time I faced my Day One with excitement for what I could do and what I could be living clean and sober was my last Day One almost eight years ago. I had abused pain killers in mega doses for nearly twenty years. I didn't even know who I was anymore nor could I remember what it was like to live clean and sober. I had no idea how I would make it but I was determined to figure it out. Obviously I did.

    The single most important thing I had to do was to forgive myself and find a way to rediscover my self esteem. Totally by accident, I discovered that random acts of kindness just made me feel good. Begin to take pride in every single good thing, every single responsible thing that you do. Do you have kids? Hug them. Tell them you love them. Do something nice for your wife unexpectedly. Smile at strangers and say good morning. It sounds hokey but these are the things that will give you a little instant gratification and the more you do, the more you'll want to do. This is an awesome addiction!

    Early on, I would set small goals for myself. I'd tell myself that I absolutely would not consider trying to get a pill for an hour. Then it would turn into "until noon", then "until tomorrow". Rinse and repeat. When I went to bed at night, I would be thankful that the day was done and I had made it., It felt so good to finally be able to lay my head on my pillow and know that I had done the right thing. In the morning, I'd take my shower and take a good long look at my eyes. Clear, blue and sparkling and I'd recall what they looked like when I was using. I don't ever want to look into those addict eyes again. It turns out that it's mostly the small things that get us through the day.

    Finally, NO! These cravings will not last forever and in fact, in the scheme of things they won't last very long at all. I would guess that with only two or three weeks into my recovery, I was already beginning to lose the obsession. By a month or certainly month and a half, those thoughts would pop into my head and would be gone. Soon, it they became no more than a fleeting thought and most times didn't even fully develop.

    If you remember nothing else I say to you, remember this: Do not ever become complacent and begin to think that you can handle one, just this one time. This has to be an all or nothing kinda thing. That sounds a lot worse than it is, by the way. I have had two surgeries, one early in 2016 and another in late May of this year. I have yet another scheduled in two weeks. All back surgeries and all my pain has been treated with Advil or Aleve. I can honestly tell you that never once have I wished I had that one pill. I don't need them and soon you won't either. I don't feel like I've been sentenced and because of my bad choices I can't get pain relief. I get enough relief to make it manageable and I'm perfectly fine. This is not to say that there won't be a time in my future that I will need pain pills again but I don't fret about it. There'll be enough time to worry about that when and if the time comes.

    Keep posting! I'll try to keep checking in on you.

    Peace,

    Cat
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  13. #13
    Catrina is offline Diamond Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jelm6 View Post
    Cat-

    I cannot tell you how grateful I am for your last message. Sharing your story gives me genuine hope. Switching to one minute at a time gives me hope. Thank you so much.

    I just got off the phone with my wife and told her I had burned the prescriptions and she said, “ok”. I said “I thought you’d be more excited or something” to which she said “I never completely understood what it was doing to you inside”. That’s the atrocious problem with being on the lower dose of 15mg for years. It’s terrible because it can be justified as “well it’s only 15mg and so it’s not too bad”. I will tell you first hand that even 15mg puts a wall between you and life. If adds a permanent fog. Yes, the eyes are not the same. The color in my face is not pure. It’s a demon that calls for the 2nd pill then the 3rd. It’s a complete and permanent distraction. I just hid it so well that my wife doesn’t see how badly it was destroying me on the inside. This is actually one of the reasons I relapsed so many times. I am not specifically blaming my w feel it was ultimately my fault, but when you keep thinking “eh just one pill today” and your wife says she doesn’t see the issue with it you said screw it and go for the pill. And that becomes 2. Then back to 3. Ugh... I love her beyond and have been truly happily married for almost 20 years to her, I just can’t get her to understand the mental torture because I suppose my bs everything is fine routine really worked for the past. Any thoughts on what to do in this situation?

    I love your smiling at people suggestion. There was a person with special needs doing the grocery bagging and I could see the person ever seeing everything wanted to make sure I wasn’t getting impatient. I just smiled at both and said thank you and yes it did feel good. In fact I actually thought “I’m not supposed to be feeling good today and that was nice.”

    Thanks for checking in, again, and I truly appreciate the continued advice.
    Hello again. Well the fact that your wife doesn't see an issue with this adds a twist, doesn't it? Not what we usually hear around here but I understand and I'm proud of you for recognizing that this has changed you and that you don't think it's for the better.

    Honesty is always the best policy. Find some quiet time to sit and talk with your wife. Try to explain to her how these pills have held you captive. Even though it hasn't affected your marriage (thank God!) for your own reasons (and try to explain them) you need to get off of them. Someone who has never been controlled by drugs can't really understand what it feels like but be patient and do try to explain. Remember too, that this journey may be scary for her too. You want change and she's got to be thinking, what kind of change? What's going on with him? He's not happy? Is it my fault? Reassure her that this has nothing to do with her or maybe find other words--that kinda sounds like you're getting ready to ask for a divorce! Maybe the easiest way for her to understand is to tell her that if you don't have the pills, you get sick and that's just not right. You shouldn't have to have them. Remember honesty--you take them even though you are not in pain. Do your best to reassure her that you love her and that you're doing this for your well being. Try to explain the fact that you live your life in a partial cloud. You don't feel extreme joy and you don't feel extreme sadness. That's not right. Just be sure she knows that it's not that you're unhappy with her. Be gentle. We women tend to listen to stuff like this and then pick it apart to try to figure out where we went wrong.

    Peace,

    Cat
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  14. #14
    Jelm6 is offline Member
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    I know a twist right? It is for me too as I would prefer for her to tell me to get off this stuff! My mother knows I've been taking it for a long time, and from time to time she asks but again because of the 15mg it has been way too easy to slide and argue that I need them. It's BS! I know for a fact that I have been lying to myself for a long time. Anyways...

    The fact that my wife is supportive but not understanding why is very challenging and I believe helped send me down to the dark side the 3 times before. Not her fault, it's just when one of the people you care about most is saying 'no big deal' and so is the devil on your shoulder... Well I gave in all times before. NOT this time. I hope and hope...

    Wow, the level of insight Cat. Thank you for a woman's perspective. It never occurred to me that she may be assigning blame to herself or feel like something was wrong with our marriage but you are spot on 100%. If I have a bad day, my wife typically takes that on, and vice versa. I did have a conversation with her about how I felt and she seemed to get that, but I agree I need to be 100% honest and yes tell her that I DID take them even when I was not in pain. I would argue that the statistic was likely 60-75% of the time I probably didn't need them. Holy geez... just typing that and looking at it is scary and freaking me out a bit.

    I am feeling pretty horrible physically right now and I'm almost at 48 hours. So you think by Thursday I should start feeling more like myself? Also, do you have any reading suggestions that would inspire?

    I SO APPRECIATE you following up and your detailed advice. I really do believe that without this forum and without your help I wouldn't be holding myself completely accountable and I would fail again.


    Quote Originally Posted by Catrina View Post
    Hello again. Well the fact that your wife doesn't see an issue with this adds a twist, doesn't it? Not what we usually hear around here but I understand and I'm proud of you for recognizing that this has changed you and that you don't think it's for the better.

    Honesty is always the best policy. Find some quiet time to sit and talk with your wife. Try to explain to her how these pills have held you captive. Even though it hasn't affected your marriage (thank God!) for your own reasons (and try to explain them) you need to get off of them. Someone who has never been controlled by drugs can't really understand what it feels like but be patient and do try to explain. Remember too, that this journey may be scary for her too. You want change and she's got to be thinking, what kind of change? What's going on with him? He's not happy? Is it my fault? Reassure her that this has nothing to do with her or maybe find other words--that kinda sounds like you're getting ready to ask for a divorce! Maybe the easiest way for her to understand is to tell her that if you don't have the pills, you get sick and that's just not right. You shouldn't have to have them. Remember honesty--you take them even though you are not in pain. Do your best to reassure her that you love her and that you're doing this for your well being. Try to explain the fact that you live your life in a partial cloud. You don't feel extreme joy and you don't feel extreme sadness. That's not right. Just be sure she knows that it's not that you're unhappy with her. Be gentle. We women tend to listen to stuff like this and then pick it apart to try to figure out where we went wrong.

    Peace,

    Cat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jelm6 View Post
    I know a twist right? It is for me too as I would prefer for her to tell me to get off this stuff! My mother knows I've been taking it for a long time, and from time to time she asks but again because of the 15mg it has been way too easy to slide and argue that I need them. It's BS! I know for a fact that I have been lying to myself for a long time. Anyways...

    The fact that my wife is supportive but not understanding why is very challenging and I believe helped send me down to the dark side the 3 times before. Not her fault, it's just when one of the people you care about most is saying 'no big deal' and so is the devil on your shoulder... Well I gave in all times before. NOT this time. I hope and hope...

    Wow, the level of insight Cat. Thank you for a woman's perspective. It never occurred to me that she may be assigning blame to herself or feel like something was wrong with our marriage but you are spot on 100%. If I have a bad day, my wife typically takes that on, and vice versa. I did have a conversation with her about how I felt and she seemed to get that, but I agree I need to be 100% honest and yes tell her that I DID take them even when I was not in pain. I would argue that the statistic was likely 60-75% of the time I probably didn't need them. Holy geez... just typing that and looking at it is scary and freaking me out a bit.

    I am feeling pretty horrible physically right now and I'm almost at 48 hours. So you think by Thursday I should start feeling more like myself? Also, do you have any reading suggestions that would inspire?

    I SO APPRECIATE you following up and your detailed advice. I really do believe that without this forum and without your help I wouldn't be holding myself completely accountable and I would fail again.
    Day 5 is the magic number. You may see some improvement before then because your dose wasn't that high. I've done it cold turkey from 200mg/day. Ouch! Now that is bad, isn't it. On day 5, the aches and RLS were gone every time. I still needed the Immodium and it worked well enough that it was a non-issue for me. Sleep was the biggie. How are you sleeping? I couldn't sleep for at least two weeks except for short, and I mean short, like 15 minute naps during those first five days. After that, I might get an hour and that was it. If you're able to get sleep now, then it shouldn't be an issue for you like it was for me. The other thing that hung on for a while was fatigue but remember, I wasn't sleeping at all either. I can't really say that anxiety was a big issue for me. It was cravings that I used to call anxiety but this time, I called it what it really was and it as cravings!

    Sorry you're feeling lousy right now but it's the poison leaving your system and that's good. Maybe that's something you can tell your wife too. If these pills aren't that big of a deal, your body wouldn't be in a state of shock and begging to be fed more pills. If she needed to take them for a bit, she would be fine when she stopped. You aren't. That says something right there.

    Wish I could recommend some reading material but I can't. Sorry. I found my inspiration right here. I'd read thread after thread from start to finish. Even the really old ones. From them, I took a leap of faith and decided that if these people were telling me that it would get better, then I had to believe that it would. It did.

    Peace,

    Cat
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    Ok day 5 is Thursday so I be looking forward to that. Sleep last night was ok as I did take 1mg of lorazepam and that helped. I also took a hot shower per suggestion for about 30 mins. I also took a 20 min nap today and reduced my normal 3-4 shots of espresso to 2 per suggestions here. Last night was really the 1st official night as my last dose (hopefully forever) was at around 630 on Sat the 16th. So I had it in my system that night. I plan to take the lorazepam just for the next few days to help with sleep based on all the suggestions with the Thomas Recipe and posts and I will stop then. I’m not getting any high or anything like that as I take it in bed as I fall asleep. If I feel good on Friday I won’t take it and see what happens.

    Yes I am in 100% agreement with you. The absolute hardest thing in the past was cravings. And breaking the routine for 6 years seems impossible but I am looking forward to starting a new life already.

    I will post again in the am, hopefully with polsitive news about the night.





    Quote Originally Posted by Catrina View Post
    Day 5 is the magic number. You may see some improvement before then because your dose wasn't that high. I've done it cold turkey from 200mg/day. Ouch! Now that is bad, isn't it. On day 5, the aches and RLS were gone every time. I still needed the Immodium and it worked well enough that it was a non-issue for me. Sleep was the biggie. How are you sleeping? I couldn't sleep for at least two weeks except for short, and I mean short, like 15 minute naps during those first five days. After that, I might get an hour and that was it. If you're able to get sleep now, then it shouldn't be an issue for you like it was for me. The other thing that hung on for a while was fatigue but remember, I wasn't sleeping at all either. I can't really say that anxiety was a big issue for me. It was cravings that I used to call anxiety but this time, I called it what it really was and it as cravings!

    Sorry you're feeling lousy right now but it's the poison leaving your system and that's good. Maybe that's something you can tell your wife too. If these pills aren't that big of a deal, your body wouldn't be in a state of shock and begging to be fed more pills. If she needed to take them for a bit, she would be fine when she stopped. You aren't. That says something right there.

    Wish I could recommend some reading material but I can't. Sorry. I found my inspiration right here. I'd read thread after thread from start to finish. Even the really old ones. From them, I took a leap of faith and decided that if these people were telling me that it would get better, then I had to believe that it would. It did.

    Peace,

    Cat

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    Thanks much for the feedback - 49.5 hours and counting...

    YEP right after I posted it was hot. I have a sweatshirt nearby that I have take on and off 4 times today. I really appreciate the encouragement as nighttime is the hardest. At this point I had taken everything when I was on the norco so it really feels bizarre and uncomfortable to just do anything at night. Ugh. I am ALL IN though.

    Quote Originally Posted by asp44 View Post
    Cold then hot!! I think everybody who has quit opiates have had issues with fluctuating chills & sweats. Thankfully for me this usually quit on day 3 for the most part. Hang in there it will get better each day. 44 hour's is great. 2-3 more days of acute symptoms, then things will slowly improve. Dont get discouraged you are doing great.

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    Hi Jelm. What helps a lot is to keep busy. Let your mind get lost with walking or listening to music, watching tv, or drawing. Coming on this forum helped me tremendously because it gave me an outlet and hope. So come on here and read read read and post post post.
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    THANK YOU - ok great additional advice. I was sort of accidentally doing that today and looking back it was definitely the easiest parts of the day. I will actually plan on that for tomorrow. I also have 2 dogs that can keep me kind of busy, sometimes not in a great was as one of them ate something and threw up earlier today so cleaning that on a day like today was a challenge. My plan is to take them to dog daycare tomorrow since it's going to rain and just try to be distracted by some tv/movies.



    Quote Originally Posted by ForMe30 View Post
    Hi Jelm. What helps a lot is to keep busy. Let your mind get lost with walking or listening to music, watching tv, or drawing. Coming on this forum helped me tremendously because it gave me an outlet and hope. So come on here and read read read and post post post.

  20. #20
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    I had a longer talk with my wife last night and was 100% honest with her and myself about the history of the norco use. After your note I looked back and decided that even when it was bad, overall I probably only needed 20-25% of what I took ever. Even less many times. It turns out that the initial accident happened just about the time my grandfather died. My parents are divorced and so I ended up living with him as a kid and even working for him as a teenager. He was like a father figure to me. Later my mother remarried and my step dad because a father figure over the years but my grandfather meant a lot. So the correlation of using the norco to help with the fact that I could really feel the lows I think is what led to the long term use mentally. My grandmother dies a few years later and I kicked it in again as I was very close with her. This is not to say I didn’t have physical pain during this time that was helped by the drug, it is to say that I was using for the wrong reason and that’s what led to my dependence. Never figured that out fully until yesterday.

    I had serious RLS last night. Really bad. Woke up maybe 10 times so that sucks. Hopefully that won’t last too long and I’m ready trying to meditate every day at 2pm to get a new routine in which is also supposed to help with pain a bit naturally. I haven’t mentioned yet but lastly I started wearing this device called quell that allegedly helps with pain. Who knows if it works. I have to wear it everyday for 2 weeks before knowing. The main thing is that I am convinced that my current level of pain in my neck is more than tolerable certainly with Tylenol and other natural treatments. I don’t want to allow my mind to EVER get back to a space where I think I NEED the norco.






    Quote Originally Posted by Catrina View Post
    Day 5 is the magic number. You may see some improvement before then because your dose wasn't that high. I've done it cold turkey from 200mg/day. Ouch! Now that is bad, isn't it. On day 5, the aches and RLS were gone every time. I still needed the Immodium and it worked well enough that it was a non-issue for me. Sleep was the biggie. How are you sleeping? I couldn't sleep for at least two weeks except for short, and I mean short, like 15 minute naps during those first five days. After that, I might get an hour and that was it. If you're able to get sleep now, then it shouldn't be an issue for you like it was for me. The other thing that hung on for a while was fatigue but remember, I wasn't sleeping at all either. I can't really say that anxiety was a big issue for me. It was cravings that I used to call anxiety but this time, I called it what it really was and it as cravings!

    Sorry you're feeling lousy right now but it's the poison leaving your system and that's good. Maybe that's something you can tell your wife too. If these pills aren't that big of a deal, your body wouldn't be in a state of shock and begging to be fed more pills. If she needed to take them for a bit, she would be fine when she stopped. You aren't. That says something right there.

    Wish I could recommend some reading material but I can't. Sorry. I found my inspiration right here. I'd read thread after thread from start to finish. Even the really old ones. From them, I took a leap of faith and decided that if these people were telling me that it would get better, then I had to believe that it would. It did.

    Peace,

    Cat
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jelm6 View Post
    I had a longer talk with my wife last night and was 100% honest with her and myself about the history of the norco use. After your note I looked back and decided that even when it was bad, overall I probably only needed 20-25% of what I took ever. Even less many times. It turns out that the initial accident happened just about the time my grandfather died. My parents are divorced and so I ended up living with him as a kid and even working for him as a teenager. He was like a father figure to me. Later my mother remarried and my step dad because a father figure over the years but my grandfather meant a lot. So the correlation of using the norco to help with the fact that I could really feel the lows I think is what led to the long term use mentally. My grandmother dies a few years later and I kicked it in again as I was very close with her. This is not to say I didn’t have physical pain during this time that was helped by the drug, it is to say that I was using for the wrong reason and that’s what led to my dependence. Never figured that out fully until yesterday.

    I had serious RLS last night. Really bad. Woke up maybe 10 times so that sucks. Hopefully that won’t last too long and I’m ready trying to meditate every day at 2pm to get a new routine in which is also supposed to help with pain a bit naturally. I haven’t mentioned yet but lastly I started wearing this device called quell that allegedly helps with pain. Who knows if it works. I have to wear it everyday for 2 weeks before knowing. The main thing is that I am convinced that my current level of pain in my neck is more than tolerable certainly with Tylenol and other natural treatments. I don’t want to allow my mind to EVER get back to a space where I think I NEED the norco.
    The RLS was always my most dreaded symptom. It's awful. Do you have a heating pad? I would take a hot bath and use the heating pad set on low wrapped around my legs. I actually used two of them. It does soothe the RLS some. Magnesium and potassium helps too so take a supplement and make those protein shakes and be sure to put a banana in it. Like I mentioned before, the RLS abruptly stopped on Day 5. I've heard of the Quell and in fact, just saw it advertised on TV last night and thought about getting one myself. Let me know if it really does work please.

    What was your wife's reaction when you spoke to her? Hopefully she understands things a little better. The bottom line is that you have recognized that taking these pills everyday isn't healthy physically or mentally so it's time to stop. Have you heard of and read about rebound pain? It's a very real phenomena when any analgesic overused will recreate more pain. The only remedy is to stop taking everything for a while and then you will be able to really assess your level of pain and any pain that you do have will respond to over the counter things very effectively. Took me a while to figure that out. Once I was clean, there were two things that I learned about pain relief and addiction. I noticed that I was reaching for the bottle of Advil all of the time. I had to stop myself when I realized that I didn't need them except to fulfill a need to take something. Anything. The other thing I noticed was that even though enough time had passed that the over the counter stuff should have been helping, I didn't think it was. Then I realized if I just got myself still and really thought about how much pain I was in, I really was getting relief. Just no buzz and I had become accustomed to pain relief equals buzz. I had to learn to separate the two. So much to learn!

    Keep posting.

    Peace,

    Cat

  22. #22
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    Your posts and this forum is the only thing saving me. I would not be able to do it without these posts and your help.

    Today I have had multiple cravings. I sent the dogs to daycare and I am meeting with some people for coffee just to get out for a bit. I have given myself a small handful of things to do but nothing too crazy and some of it is simply watching some tv which is hard for me to just sit.

    I have not heard of rebound pain but I appreciate you sharing your history. Every time I tried quitting for the last 3 times I had pain come back and thought "well I need it so I'll just take a little less" and you can guess how long that lasted (1-2 weeks most before I took a little more on weekends and then back down during the week then all the way back up.) I'm glad you shared this part of your history because I will go into it prepared and I will know what to expect.

    It was hard to talk to my wife about this because in this unique situation I was maintaining 3 pills for years. Yes on occasion I would take 4 or even 4 1/2 but for 95% of the time I was on it I was taking 3. So because of this I was able to hide easily behind it. I was able to put on a show that it was fine even though I was torn inside and knew in my heart I was abusing the norco. I had a long conversation with her and per your advice I have to say - excellent advice. She didn't feel blame, but once I was really honest with her (and myself) and told her that I was taking the norco for other reasons than to manage the pain... I was taking it for the lift and the disconnection in some cases (after my grandparents passed) and not for pain. She really understood everything in a different light. She just had surgery recently and needs to lose some weight by doctors orders. 10 days ago she started a diet with a sponsor she checks in with every day and went from eating a lot, to a lot less and taking that jump certainly correlates to cold turkey. In this way she gets it. She was incredibly supportive as I have been to her and this new diet. I don't think she'll ever understand the conflict that goes on with these opiates in our heads though. Ever. It is like a dark force tempting you to just do it. I cannot believe how much anxiety, frustration, and sadness I have felt because of the norco.

    It still doesn't seem real that I am able to quit. What may seem incredible is that even on a lower dose like I was on it absolutely DESTROYS who you are. I read many other posts and it was almost impossible to find anyone that was only taking 15-20 mg. Very challenging. But I can tell you first hand that it absolutely ruins you. RUINS. Regardless of the dose, it's the length of time in the system. In just 60 hours I look at myself in the mirror and I look different. Maybe it's in my head. Maybe it's withdrawal. I feel like my true self has been behind a foggy glass. I told my wife that it's like living life as a low-quality mp3. You don't get the richness of life like you would in music with an uncompressed music track. You get this in-between, no lows, no highs, just kind of a version of what people are experiencing around you. Ugh... I am rambling on... I needed this forum more than you know and I'm thankful for your continued advice.




    Quote Originally Posted by Catrina View Post
    The RLS was always my most dreaded symptom. It's awful. Do you have a heating pad? I would take a hot bath and use the heating pad set on low wrapped around my legs. I actually used two of them. It does soothe the RLS some. Magnesium and potassium helps too so take a supplement and make those protein shakes and be sure to put a banana in it. Like I mentioned before, the RLS abruptly stopped on Day 5. I've heard of the Quell and in fact, just saw it advertised on TV last night and thought about getting one myself. Let me know if it really does work please.

    What was your wife's reaction when you spoke to her? Hopefully she understands things a little better. The bottom line is that you have recognized that taking these pills everyday isn't healthy physically or mentally so it's time to stop. Have you heard of and read about rebound pain? It's a very real phenomena when any analgesic overused will recreate more pain. The only remedy is to stop taking everything for a while and then you will be able to really assess your level of pain and any pain that you do have will respond to over the counter things very effectively. Took me a while to figure that out. Once I was clean, there were two things that I learned about pain relief and addiction. I noticed that I was reaching for the bottle of Advil all of the time. I had to stop myself when I realized that I didn't need them except to fulfill a need to take something. Anything. The other thing I noticed was that even though enough time had passed that the over the counter stuff should have been helping, I didn't think it was. Then I realized if I just got myself still and really thought about how much pain I was in, I really was getting relief. Just no buzz and I had become accustomed to pain relief equals buzz. I had to learn to separate the two. So much to learn!

    Keep posting.

    Peace,

    Cat
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jelm6 View Post
    Your posts and this forum is the only thing saving me. I would not be able to do it without these posts and your help.

    Today I have had multiple cravings. I sent the dogs to daycare and I am meeting with some people for coffee just to get out for a bit. I have given myself a small handful of things to do but nothing too crazy and some of it is simply watching some tv which is hard for me to just sit.

    I have not heard of rebound pain but I appreciate you sharing your history. Every time I tried quitting for the last 3 times I had pain come back and thought "well I need it so I'll just take a little less" and you can guess how long that lasted (1-2 weeks most before I took a little more on weekends and then back down during the week then all the way back up.) I'm glad you shared this part of your history because I will go into it prepared and I will know what to expect.

    It was hard to talk to my wife about this because in this unique situation I was maintaining 3 pills for years. Yes on occasion I would take 4 or even 4 1/2 but for 95% of the time I was on it I was taking 3. So because of this I was able to hide easily behind it. I was able to put on a show that it was fine even though I was torn inside and knew in my heart I was abusing the norco. I had a long conversation with her and per your advice I have to say - excellent advice. She didn't feel blame, but once I was really honest with her (and myself) and told her that I was taking the norco for other reasons than to manage the pain... I was taking it for the lift and the disconnection in some cases (after my grandparents passed) and not for pain. She really understood everything in a different light. She just had surgery recently and needs to lose some weight by doctors orders. 10 days ago she started a diet with a sponsor she checks in with every day and went from eating a lot, to a lot less and taking that jump certainly correlates to cold turkey. In this way she gets it. She was incredibly supportive as I have been to her and this new diet. I don't think she'll ever understand the conflict that goes on with these opiates in our heads though. Ever. It is like a dark force tempting you to just do it. I cannot believe how much anxiety, frustration, and sadness I have felt because of the norco.

    It still doesn't seem real that I am able to quit. What may seem incredible is that even on a lower dose like I was on it absolutely DESTROYS who you are. I read many other posts and it was almost impossible to find anyone that was only taking 15-20 mg. Very challenging. But I can tell you first hand that it absolutely ruins you. RUINS. Regardless of the dose, it's the length of time in the system. In just 60 hours I look at myself in the mirror and I look different. Maybe it's in my head. Maybe it's withdrawal. I feel like my true self has been behind a foggy glass. I told my wife that it's like living life as a low-quality mp3. You don't get the richness of life like you would in music with an uncompressed music track. You get this in-between, no lows, no highs, just kind of a version of what people are experiencing around you. Ugh... I am rambling on... I needed this forum more than you know and I'm thankful for your continued advice.
    That's exactly right. I used to feel like life was just happening but I wasn't participating. I had stopped trying to make a difference or go beyond what I had to do. Not in the lazy, I don't want to clean my house way. But with almost all other things. If I knew I owed my sister a phone call, I'd take a pill and put it off. I went through the motions. I stopped enjoying socializing and that most definitely isn't me. I'm a social critter by nature. It got to the point that I just wanted to go to work and then come home and isolate. I'd laugh if it was appropriate to laugh but it wasn't heartfelt. We end up being just a shell of what we once were.

    I've seen others on this Forum with habits similar to your's. I have to admit that in the beginning, compared to me I couldn't help but think, "OH get over it. That's nothing!". Not anymore. I've seen it over and over and it's an absolute fact that even what some would consider a small habit is troublesome and creates all of the same detox symptoms and difficulty dealing with cravings, etc. early in recovery. Don't ever feel like you need to justify how you feel around here. We get it.

    You are doing all of the right things and I give you tremendous credit. It's not easy forcing yourself up and out during these first few days especially. It'll get easier for you once you've finished detoxing. You'll feel a little lackluster but the best thing is to keep pushing yourself. Physical activity will kick start the production of all your natural feel good chemicals. With prolonged opiate use, our bodies stop producing all that good stuff. This is what explains what you're feeling. Your brain receptors are being stripped bare and you haven't begun to produce your own chemicals yet. As you recover things will get back to where they're supposed to be and you'll feel better physically and emotionally. Right now your brain is begging to be fed and it's not so it's screaming. No short cuts. We have to go through the process and then Mother Nature will kick in and give you what you need instead of having to reach for a bottle.

    Peace,

    Cat
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    Why does today seem harder than the past 2 days? I had coffee with a friend (decaf) and that was a good distraction. But the body temp. The cravings. The f’in repeated “I should take one”. Not conscious. Unconsciously I came back from the coffee and accidentally thought that. Then I got super annoyed. When will those end? I assume this is from the routine of 6 years but I hate this part. I honestly can deal with the physical irritations more easily.

    I put the Quell app on when I thought about the pill as a natural new routine. Hopefully I can train my brain to stop bothering me with that poison but it seems like it’s never going to happen...





    Quote Originally Posted by Catrina View Post
    That's exactly right. I used to feel like life was just happening but I wasn't participating. I had stopped trying to make a difference or go beyond what I had to do. Not in the lazy, I don't want to clean my house way. But with almost all other things. If I knew I owed my sister a phone call, I'd take a pill and put it off. I went through the motions. I stopped enjoying socializing and that most definitely isn't me. I'm a social critter by nature. It got to the point that I just wanted to go to work and then come home and isolate. I'd laugh if it was appropriate to laugh but it wasn't heartfelt. We end up being just a shell of what we once were.

    I've seen others on this Forum with habits similar to your's. I have to admit that in the beginning, compared to me I couldn't help but think, "OH get over it. That's nothing!". Not anymore. I've seen it over and over and it's an absolute fact that even what some would consider a small habit is troublesome and creates all of the same detox symptoms and difficulty dealing with cravings, etc. early in recovery. Don't ever feel like you need to justify how you feel around here. We get it.

    You are doing all of the right things and I give you tremendous credit. It's not easy forcing yourself up and out during these first few days especially. It'll get easier for you once you've finished detoxing. You'll feel a little lackluster but the best thing is to keep pushing yourself. Physical activity will kick start the production of all your natural feel good chemicals. With prolonged opiate use, our bodies stop producing all that good stuff. This is what explains what you're feeling. Your brain receptors are being stripped bare and you haven't begun to produce your own chemicals yet. As you recover things will get back to where they're supposed to be and you'll feel better physically and emotionally. Right now your brain is begging to be fed and it's not so it's screaming. No short cuts. We have to go through the process and then Mother Nature will kick in and give you what you need instead of having to reach for a bottle.

    Peace,

    Cat

  25. #25
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    Hardest day so far. I feel terrible and hollow...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jelm6 View Post
    Hardest day so far. I feel terrible and hollow...
    Yeah. I know it's hard. Keep pushing. A couple more days and you'll begin to feel better. Take a nice hot bath and a melatonin. Hopefully, you'll be able to get some sleep tonight. You're so close now. So close.

    Peace,

    Cat
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    Ok... thank you for the support. I have a vitamin that a friend recommended that is zinc, magnesium, and a couple of other things for sleep. I may try it tonight.


    Quote Originally Posted by Catrina View Post
    Yeah. I know it's hard. Keep pushing. A couple more days and you'll begin to feel better. Take a nice hot bath and a melatonin. Hopefully, you'll be able to get some sleep tonight. You're so close now. So close.

    Peace,

    Cat

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    Hang in there. You have come a long way and the acute part of your wd should be done anytime. Hope you can get a goods night sleep as that will definitely make a huge difference in your overall well being. Soon instead the hollow feeling you are having will be replaced with a feeling of accomplishment. Keep pushing thru & do your best to stay positive. You have the willpower to beat this and you have really done a great job up to this point. Best of luck
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    I slept ok last night. Not great as I have a bad cough, runny nose, hot and cold sweats still a bit. But overall considering, it was a solid night. Based on the advice and knowing the importance of sleep to the mind I actually woke up, took care of some emails and got the kids to school then went back to sleep for another 45 minutes or so. RLS 3 or 4 times last night but nothing terrible.

    Today I feel ok. Still confused that this is actually happening and I’m finally doing it. Doesn’t seem real. I am just resting as I can today until the afternoon when the kids come home. When I go back to work Monday my boss already told me there are a couple of projects he and the team are readying for next week. I am really nervous about that. Not that I won’t be able to handle it, just that all my routines are shattered and it’s easier now as I am in control of my schedule. How do people continue this when having to answer to other people?

    This weekend my wife and I are supposed to go to dinner with friends. What do I do about having any alcohol while I am detoxing this poison out of my system? I never had a problem with alcohol, was always a casual drinker. Maybe 2 drinks at a dinner. But I feel like I should wait until a certain point before having a drink. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

  30. #30
    Randy35 is offline Platinum Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jelm6 View Post
    I slept ok last night. Not great as I have a bad cough, runny nose, hot and cold sweats still a bit. But overall considering, it was a solid night. Based on the advice and knowing the importance of sleep to the mind I actually woke up, took care of some emails and got the kids to school then went back to sleep for another 45 minutes or so. RLS 3 or 4 times last night but nothing terrible.

    Today I feel ok. Still confused that this is actually happening and I’m finally doing it. Doesn’t seem real. I am just resting as I can today until the afternoon when the kids come home. When I go back to work Monday my boss already told me there are a couple of projects he and the team are readying for next week. I am really nervous about that. Not that I won’t be able to handle it, just that all my routines are shattered and it’s easier now as I am in control of my schedule. How do people continue this when having to answer to other people?

    This weekend my wife and I are supposed to go to dinner with friends. What do I do about having any alcohol while I am detoxing this poison out of my system? I never had a problem with alcohol, was always a casual drinker. Maybe 2 drinks at a dinner. But I feel like I should wait until a certain point before having a drink. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

    Hello Jeim -

    Congratulations on stopping the Norco. Lets hope this time is the last time you need to do this. Like you it took me many times before I finally found success. I can tell you straightt theres nothing better than to never have to worry about chasing, obtaining, and counting pills ever again. I spent nearly 18 years of my life addicted to something. I now have over 3 years clean. You can do this, if you want it bad enough.

    You asked how do people continue this (sobriety) when having to answer to other people? The short answer is one day at a time, one hour at a time, and even one minute at a time. Time makes all the difference in this deal. As more time passes the urge to use, and cravings diminish. What helps is to have a support system in place. Meetings in NA or AA, Celebrate Recovery, Smart Recovery, or one on one counseling with a therapist can make a huge difference. Also going back to work can make a big difference too. Staying busy is key to not thinking about pills. If your work load is such that it keeps your mind occupied the thought of using pills isn't at the forefront. Stay as busy as possible every single day.

    As for drinking alcohol on the night out with friends....I'll give you my thoughts on the matter. I wouldn't partake if I were you and here's why...Your brain doesn't know the difference between alcohol and narcotic pills. Alcohol hits the very same receptors in your brain that pills do. It ignites those feel good receptors and thinks it's in business again. And many times a drink or two or three of alcohol gets us interested in that one pill again. We think we have a few days of sobriety and it's ok to try some alcohol and then just one pill and think we can stop at that. You know what happens next. If I were you I would come up with any excuse possible to not drink on that night. You're waaay too early in your recovery.

    Again, congratulations. You should be very proud of yourself!

    Randy

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