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Will my body handle the chronic pain if I get off my oxycodone and oxymophone
  1. #1
    Duffylou73 is offline New Member
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    Default Will my body handle the chronic pain if I get off my oxycodone and oxymophone

    My pain started when I was 18, I'm 42 now. When I started my opiate treatment I was on lortab 10mgs. I was doing landscape maintenance because of a layoff in my old field I was in. So I was getting the exercise everyday. In the winter of 2012 the pain began to get worse. In September I had to quit my job and try to get surgery on my back. Not only did it take forever to get a chance for surgery I had to start in pain management. When I started pain management I was on oxycodone 15mgs 4 times a day. I had surgery in February 2013. It helped my leg pain, but not so much on my back.
    I've been through 3 different pain management places. It seemed all they wanted to do was injections and pills. It was frustrating me.
    I got into a place that bumped my pills upto 6 oxycodone 30mgs 6 times a day and 2 oxymophone 40mgs 2 times a day. This was over a one year period. Don't get me wrong they tried Nero simulators that was placed next to my spine, some injections. It just didn't work for me. My energy just diminished. I also was getting terrible stomach pains. I started to realize this doctor had no idea what he was doing when he said my stomach pain was due to pin worms. I didn't have any signs of that. So I did my research on all the pain clinics that were close to me. I found a great doctor, but after another MRI that showed nothing BAD ENOUGH for surgery. I'm stuck, not sure where to go from this point. This doctor dropped my meds down to 4 oxycodone 30mgs 4 times a day and 2 oxymophone 10mgs 2 times a day ( half of what I was on before). That was a hard 2 months.
    Now I'm looking for answers, I have 2 bulging disks, 1 fusion, stenosis all down my lumbar spine ( not bad enough for surgery ).
    My question is will my body handle my pain if I try to get off opiates all the way? I did try a knock off of suboxone, I'm alergic to the medicine in that. Plus the pain after 3 or 4 days was pretty bad.
    Last edited by Anonymous; 07-27-2016 at 07:19 PM.

  2. #2
    Ricky71 is offline Advanced Member
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    Duffy - welcome to the forum. The answer to your question maybe? It is very possible, you would be surprised to find out that a lot of people that get off opiates can manage their pain with OTC meds like aspirin, ibuprofen, etc...? Have you heard of rebound pain? You won't know your true and accurate pain level until you are off all opiates for a while? Opiate withdrawal is terrible, it is not dangerous but it is uncomfortable to say the least! Cold turkey would be the fastest way to get off the opiates, you are looking at severe flu-like symptoms for a week and then continued lack of energy, insomnia, some anxiety and depression for a few weeks to a few months? Your other option is a very, very slow taper as to minimize or eliminate any discomfort or withdrawal symptoms? The taper would be 10-15% reductions every 5-7 days, the slower the taper the better. Once you get to the lower doses then you would go even slower. You can adjust the taper faster or slower depending on how you feel? With tapering, slow and steady wins the race!

    Here's some info on opiate induced pain (rebound pain) -

    Opiate Induced Pain -
    When it comes to prescription medications that contain opiates, as well as other opiate street drugs, there is a double-edged sword that comes with the relief these drugs provide. On one side of the sword is the swift and often euphoric relief of symptoms. In the case of someone who has suffered an injury or other long-term pain condition, the relief from the pain is initially quite profound. For the social user or addict, the relief comes more from the euphoria itself in that the drugs alleviate the emotional pain in their lives. Either way, the effects can be very powerful.

    On the other side of the sword lies the issue of opiate induced pain. Opiate Induced Pain known scientifically as hyperalgesia. Hyperalgesia literally means “more pain”. It is quite common in those treated for chronic pain conditions such as chronic back pain, arthritis and other conditions that seemingly require long-term pain management.

    There are two types of Opiate Induced Pain. One is immediate, while the other may be gradual. Neither one is psychosomatic. They are both very real pains with very real causes.

    Rebound Pain -

    When an individual takes excessive doses of a narcotic painkiller, an opiate specifically, they experience a huge shift euphorically. Either their pain goes away or they may still be in pain, but they no longer care. The body becomes drowsy and goes to sleep. By going to sleep, the abuser “believes” the pain is not only reduced but also eliminated. Actually though they feel like this because of being in a drug-induced sleep.

    Rebound pain occurs when the opiates begin to wear off, or metabolize out of the system. The individual is now very conscious of the pain they are experiencing, the drugs are wearing off and the body does not want to be in pain anymore. This sparks the rebound pain to such a degree that the individual may immediately take another large dose of the prescribed opiates.

    Typical Hyperalgesia -
    This more gradual kind of opiate induced pain comes over a period of months or years in conjunction with the body’s ability to gain tolerance for a specific opiate. The longer an individual takes the medication, the more pain they find themselves. They believe their condition is getting worse, requiring an increase in their pain medications in frequency, dosages, or both. Because it is so gradual, even medical professionals sometimes miss the symptoms. After all, their patient may be the president of the PTA, a grandmother who simply wants to knit more blankets for her grandchildren, or a father who desperately needs to earn a living to support his family. These are not “drug users” who break into homes to steal painkillers or other drugs. It is so easy for medical professionals to over-prescribe the drugs that some states have begun a regulatory program at the point of origin: policing the doctors and making them accountable for the prescriptions they write.

    In the meantime, the individual patient can be developing a serious addiction to opiates without even realizing it.

    How To Determine If Someone is Having Opiate Induced Pain -
    This is a very tricky question, because pain is pain. Opiate induced pain is just as real as the pain of a broken bone or a chronic back pain issue. The question that one should ask is this: Is this individual addicted to their pain medication?

    The best way to determine whether someone’s pain is induced by the opiates or caused by some other genesis, there is only one solution. Remove opiates from the equation. Chances are, if an individual has been taking opiates for pain for a long period of time, they have developed a tolerance, and they have become dependent. This is simply physical fact. While there is a fine line dividing physical dependency and full-blown addiction, for the purposes of determining whether pain is induced by opiate dependency and tolerance, they are very much the same.

    The withdrawal period when an individual stops taking opiates can be agonizing; however, it is not medically dangerous. The best plan would be to seek medical advice from a professional who can prescribe non-narcotic aids to help with the process. It is not possible to determine the level of actual condition-specific pain a person has until the opiates are completely out of the system. How long this takes depends upon the individual and the dosages and tolerance they have developed.

    In many cases of long-term opiate use, the opiate induced pain is significantly more than the actual pain the individual must deal with on a daily basis.

    The Next Step -

    If an individual has decided not to take opiates due to opiate induced pain, they should have a conversation with their doctor about the medical options open to them. Perhaps non-addictive anti-inflammatory medications can help ease the cause of the pain they are experiencing. The choice is ultimately up to the individual and their doctor. Whatever decision they make for their ongoing care, they will not have to deal with the excruciating opiate induced pain they have experienced.

    Good luck and keep us updated, we are here to help? God bless us all!
    Last edited by Anonymous; 07-27-2016 at 07:19 PM.
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  3. #3
    Thisweekforsure is offline Advanced Member
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    Ricky posted some good information. I too have chronic pain and was on oxycodone for a long time. When I stopped, the pain was worse only temporarily. It took a couple of months before what I think is now my "normal", which turns out to be pretty much exactly what it was when I was on the drugs, or actually probably a bit better. I too have stenosis and some bulging disks, nerve pain, arthritis, and some other stuff. The trick is that you need to stay off the drugs for several weeks, or two or three months before making a judgment. I have found great relief in therapeutic massage.

  4. #4
    Duffylou73 is offline New Member
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    Thank you, I'm working 6-7 days a week. I'm trying to plan on getting the trailer and getting in the hills with some toys, to try to get my mind off the pain. I'm hoping I can go to work when I get back. I won't have much time only 6 days tops.
    Thank you for your help!!

  5. #5
    greendingy is offline New Member
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    You seem to be very knowledgeable in this subject. So am asking you a question as well.
    I had a cervical fusion at age 50. The surgeon damaged the nerve root at c5/6...I had very large bone spurs that were toothing down on the same nerve. He had clamped the vertabrae too high to get the spurs shaved. I was in excrutiaing pain..like 20 wasps stinging my scapulas and felt like my arm was broken. I had to stop working. I never took a pain pill before this and am not an addidct at all. However, I would rather ave not lived than have that kind of pain. In the beginning I took methadone but it made me non functional..and I was VERY productive before. So I went on to a long acting morphine which helped. I reduced the 100 mgs twice a day several years ago to once a day, and started taking oxycodone this year. 30 mgs twice a day, which I used sometimes with half a morphine...depending on how hurt I was. If I do anything wrong, Im in bed and can't move my neck for weeks. Its been twelve years! Recently some steroid shots really worked for months and I reduced my opiates down to one oxy or a half of a morphine a day. I get the sniffles, and my legs ache. But I am not taking more. My question is this: Many people as mentioned above had much more opiate abuse going on. I am not abusing, and have really slimed it down. Will my withdrawls be easier if I continue to slim down even more? Is there any way if I slim down to a quarter, that I can get away without severe withdrawls? Thanks for answering if you or anyone else gets this. I once forgot me meds at someones house for 48 hours..and I could see how awful just the beginning of withdrawl was..I won't go through that alone thats for sure.
    Last edited by Anonymous; 09-01-2017 at 12:14 PM. Reason: spelling

  6. #6
    greendingy is offline New Member
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    Default getting off opiates

    Hello, I wrote below to your post but don't think it went through so I will write here.
    I felt you knew a great deal about this subject.
    So I have a question, but first my story.
    in 2005, I was 50, (female), had a extremely neccessary cervical fusion..It was at a 9; large bone spurs had clamped down on the same nerve and the disc was replaced with my hip bone. Unfortunately, it was not till many years later that I found out that the surgeon had clamped up to high and injured the nerve root, which is supposedly permanent.
    I was taking, 12 years ago, methadone. I have a pain specialist. That or morphine were the only ones that took away what I can only say was excrutiating crazy pain...can't speak and walked in circles.
    I had never taken pills before this an am not an addict. I never took more than prescribed and often less. I hated methadone, couldn't concentrate, and I do a lot of reading and writing. I could not use my right arm and had to stop working as an artist, which was how I made my living for thirty5 years.
    Now, I started taking oycodone, 30 mgs twice a day..and if I needed more if I was in an "attack" mode due to any motion, Id be in bed for three weeks. Steroid shots have helped tremendously and in the past onthI have tapered down to one or less oxycodone a day, or half a morpine. My body does ache a bit and I have the sniffles.

    I would love to get off of these completely. I never got high, or felt anything..but my family noticed a difference in my behavior in the fist five ears. Now, I don't take very much because my pain is better. Nevertheless..its been 12 years! Do you think if I maybe I wean off more, I might not go through horrible withdrawls? Or does everybody, no matter how low they get to, go through the same horrible withdrawl? My pain Dr. said jst keep weaning, but I am afraid to do this alone if I am ging to go through major two weeks or more withdrawls. Don't want to do that alone. Any thoughts? Thanks!
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  7. #7
    gomphrena is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by greendingy View Post
    Hello, I wrote below to your post but don't think it went through so I will write here.
    I felt you knew a great deal about this subject.
    So I have a question, but first my story.
    in 2005, I was 50, (female), had a extremely neccessary cervical fusion..It was at a 9; large bone spurs had clamped down on the same nerve and the disc was replaced with my hip bone. Unfortunately, it was not till many years later that I found out that the surgeon had clamped up to high and injured the nerve root, which is supposedly permanent.
    I was taking, 12 years ago, methadone. I have a pain specialist. That or morphine were the only ones that took away what I can only say was excrutiating crazy pain...can't speak and walked in circles.
    I had never taken pills before this an am not an addict. I never took more than prescribed and often less. I hated methadone, couldn't concentrate, and I do a lot of reading and writing. I could not use my right arm and had to stop working as an artist, which was how I made my living for thirty5 years.
    Now, I started taking oycodone, 30 mgs twice a day..and if I needed more if I was in an "attack" mode due to any motion, Id be in bed for three weeks. Steroid shots have helped tremendously and in the past onthI have tapered down to one or less oxycodone a day, or half a morpine. My body does ache a bit and I have the sniffles.

    I would love to get off of these completely. I never got high, or felt anything..but my family noticed a difference in my behavior in the fist five ears. Now, I don't take very much because my pain is better. Nevertheless..its been 12 years! Do you think if I maybe I wean off more, I might not go through horrible withdrawls? Or does everybody, no matter how low they get to, go through the same horrible withdrawl? My pain Dr. said jst keep weaning, but I am afraid to do this alone if I am ging to go through major two weeks or more withdrawls. Don't want to do that alone. Any thoughts? Thanks!
    Hi, I'm a fellow pain sufferer and will be 62 years old in the spring. I've not seen a reply to your quesrion, but your pain and meds are remotely similar to mine. Please pardon the typos, I'm sure I have them, but can't see what I'm writing because I'm using my phone.

  8. #8
    david1005 is offline New Member
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    Oxycodone is used to help relieve moderate to severe pain. Oxycodone belongs to a class of drugs known as opioid analgesics. It works in the brain to change how your body feels and responds to pain.

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