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Percocet, endocet
  1. #1
    Lelo is offline New Member
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    Default Percocet, endocet

    Hi I am new to this forum, actually my first one. I am prescribed 3 7.5 endocet a day obviously for pain. My question or concern is my doctor is very reluctant to up me, of course I am hitting my ceiling and the pain is sometimes not bearable. I may ask him to at least up me to 10's. Are there any other higher doses of perccocet?? I have heard of a 15mg percocet, but have never seen one??? Is there such a pill?? what about this dysphoric feeling i have, i used to be happy at first taking this med, but now i am moody depressed etc... any advice as to why i am feeling this way?? i know it has to be these pills!!!!

  2. #2
    mpvt is offline Platinum Member
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    If this is acute pain then your doctor will leave you were you are.If this is chronic pain then percocets (endocets) are to weak to do any good.As your experiencing,you already need a dose increase.Ask the doctor for sustained release oxycodone.When people have chronic pain they are rarely given short acting opiates for the pain,they are given sustained release like ms contin(morphine) or oxycontin(oxycodone),some doctors will prescribe a small amount of short acting opiates for break through pain but as the patient stabilizes on their sustained release dose they don'y really need the short acting.....Dave

  3. #3
    blues delux is offline New Member
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    Can anyone tell me what the difference is between oxycocet and oxycodone?

  4. #4
    zippysgoddess is offline Platinum Member
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    Oxycocet is just another brand name for a drug that contains the same stuff as Percocet or Lortab. It contains Acetaminophen and Oxycodone.

    Oxycodone by itself is just that, Oxycodone without anything else added, not Acetaminophen, Aspirin, or Ibuprofen.

    Regular Oxycodone is available in both Extended and Instant release forms. The instant is available in a max of 30mgs and the extended/controlled is available in a max of 80mgs.



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  5. #5
    zippysgoddess is offline Platinum Member
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    Now, as to your pain problems, Dave is correct, what you need really depends on your conditions. If this is something that causes pain that will continue to worsen for the rest of your life, and cannot be fixed with surgery, therapy or etc. then you need something long acting that will control it adequately.

    If it is a short term condition, (the differences Dave meant between acute [temporary] and chronic [permanent]) then they will not give you long acting meds like that. No, there is no 15mg of Percocet, the highest it is available in, regardless of the brand name, is 10mgs with the Acetaminophen.

    Now, as to your question about the happiness, verses the depression, well your own pain and medical conditions will cause depression and since narcotics are actually depressants, because of the way they work on your body, they will just aggravate your condition. The happiness you felt was just a temporary euphoric side effect that some people experience from narcotics and it does eventually wear off after several weeks, if you are taking the same dose on a regular basis.

    I would also like to add that there could be several reasons that your doctor doesn't want to prescribe anything stronger, if they don't know what is causing your pain, then it is only natural that he would be reluctant, until they have something from tests or whatever, that validates your condition, they have to worry that you are just drug seeking. Flat out asking your doctor to up your dose, is typical drug seeking behavior, most people with chronic conditions that really need pain relief will talk to their doctor about the pain, but they do not ask for an increase, they leave that up to their doctor because they have much more medical training than the individual under their care.

    Also, if you are always whining about your pain and not giving your meds adequate time to work, they will be reluctant to change your dosage, it can take several weeks, maybe a month or more, for meds to hit their therapeutic levels in your body and provide the full benefits, if you aren't giving them that amount of time, they will not want to up you just yet. You also need to make sure you are taking them as prescribed, either as needed, or at regular intervals as instructed by your doctor and on your prescription. Many people make the mistake of complaining about their pain, but they don't want to take meds all the time, so the doc is left to think your pain must not be that bad then.

    And another problem is the new DEA/FDA restrictions on prescribing them, some requirements cary by state, but some are federal so they apply to everyone. Some of the universal ones for EVERY state include that your doctor has to keep track of every single narcotic prescription they right that is in the schedule II or I class of drugs, these are considered highly dangerous and addictive. So they have to keep logs of all the prescriptions for those that they write, in New York state, to my understanding, they have to keep copies and send them in to a state databank. At any time they may be asked why they prescribed these drugs to this patient, and they have to be ready to justify the need for them or they risk losing their medical license, and thus their whole livelihoods. So if they don't have a definitive disgnosis for the problem, they can be very reluctant to prescribe narcotics. Some states have even cracked down on this action to include Benzos as well, and state and Medicare coverages usually do not cover benzos at all anymore.

    Another problem, which can be an inconvenience for both of you, is another federal regulation, they can no longer provide you with any refills on class I or II meds. So you have to see your doctor, at least monthly for new prescriptions each time you run out, and if you lose your meds, use too many and run out faster than you should, or if they are stolen, most docs will not provide you with more any earlier than you should have been originally due for them. The need for monthly visits creats more of a work load for your doctor and the need for you to have to go in every month. And the controlled release (long acting) meds are all in the higher drug classes, so no refills.

    You will also be closely monitored by the pharmacies, your insurance, your doctor, and the government to make sure you aren't doctor, hospital, and/or pharmacy shopping to abuse the meds.

    So, unfortunately, all the abuser out there, have made these new regulations necessary, and that results in those of us with chronic pain having to face strict regulations to get our meds for pain relief and some doctors, as much as is a shame that they have to be so, have to fear for their medical license everytime they sign one of those scrips, so some of them just will not prescribe that type of stuff at all.

    In the long run, if your condition is chronic, you might be better off to find a pain management clinic in your area and get your doc to refer you there. While you still have to go through some rigamarol to get meds there, such as signing a non-abuse contract and such, they are less reluctant to prescribe them if they are genuinely needed and they also know the best med combinations to help people with pain issues.



    My information is not guaranteed correct. I do not get them right all the time, but I do enjoy the hunt~

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