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Buprenorphine Withdrawal is Surmountable
  1. #1
    Mbrazile is offline New Member
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    Default Buprenorphine Withdrawal is Surmountable

    As a twenty six year old male who has been taking suboxone incessantly following a motorcycle accident my senior year of high school, I was like so many people unable to voluntarily subject myself to the bout of psychological torture that results from ceasing to take the powerful narcotic that I had come to desperately depend on.

    Due to the immense cost of suboxone medication, a friend and I worked out a way to share the cost among us in order to benefit us both, and an unhealthy relationship developed between that person and myself. While recognizing my vulnerability in a situation in which I had to depend on someone else for the substance that was the very essence of my entire being, I continued and trusted that it would be okay. Of course this lasted a long time, but not forever, and ultimately led to me being abruptly cut off from my medicine supply while taking 4mg per day. There is no fear like the kind you feel when your drugs are all gone, and I panicked.

    I got emotional, and I got very upset. A visceral sense of terror and anxiety took me over, and like so many thousands of others I scoured the internet for anything in which I might find solace or comfort. Ultimately, the fear and anxiety subsided the moment I accepted what had happened, resigned myself to my fate, and acknowledged the inevitability of what was to come. In a strange way, that became comforting in and of itself.

    Without having to go into the oh-so well known list of symptoms of withdrawal that lasted for three weeks more or less, I can offer some very simple advice to those who are facing this problem themselves. Think to yourself of what kind of person you want to be, and if you want to be someone that is strong enough to face down the challenge. Ruminate over the liberty you have sacrificed and missed out on the entire time that you have been shackled and enslaved by the drug you are so utterly dependent on. Think about the gratifying freedom that the struggle will yield you, and simply accept the oncoming pain and mental agony. Think about the time, money, and energy that you have wasted throughout the duration of your drug dependence, and constantly remind yourself that this struggle will yield you freedom. Try and gather any form of support that may rally behind you and aid you in accomplishing this task.

    While in the depths of physical discomfort and utter despair, do your very best to continue to do the bare minimum that you must to survive. Do not stare at the clock, and do not focus on the pain you are in. Take it one day at a time, and before too long you will wake up one morning and utterly revel in the subsidence of your withdrawal symptoms, while at the same time reinforcing in your own mind that this is a challenge that you can beat.

    I personally am very blessed to live with my older brother who supports me in this struggle and has done what he can to help me out, and without him this experience would have been far more difficult to surmount. I do not explicitly recommend or discourage the use of any particular drug that may aid your ability to endure, but every person is different and must find out exactly what will work best for them.

    The old personality of mine has rallied and is making a strong comeback, and it truly puts into perspective just how much of myself was lost and deadened under the influence of such a strong drug like buprenorphine. My emotions are intense, and believe it or not there are moments of joy and serenity that I have come to cherish. I play my guitar again, I listen to music like never before, and I am able to relax ANY time, instead of relaxing only while on my drug. In a sort of epiphany, it is so clear to me that these types of moments were impossible while under the influence of buprenorphine, because at the time the only thing in my life that could bring me happiness or joy was to get and take more of the drug itself. This is extraordinarily sad, and illustrates the sinister and subtle ways in which addiction and dependence can alter all the way to your very core. Furthermore, I have lost weight, improved my diet, and my sense of male-impotence has vanished completely.

    You can do this, think of your future. I can assure you that there are challenges that far surpass that of buprenorphine cessation by an entire order of magnitude, and it could be so much worse. Do this for yourself, you will love yourself for having met the challenge and reclaiming your own personal freedom.

  2. #2
    Lvg nghtmare is offline Platinum Member
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    Congratulations on a new way of life.
    Truly inspiring post..
    Thank you..
    ***Stay Strong for Today***

  3. #3
    Wavision is offline Member
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    Great post. Congrats on getting clean.

    I'm almost there. Today is day 4 at .18mg. I'm obviously tapering and will not be jumping off at 4mg like you, so hopefully the ride isn't too rough.

    How long have you been off this junk?

  4. #4
    Mbrazile is offline New Member
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    Approximately sixty days. It took thirty or so for the symptoms to go from subsiding and being intermittent to being just about gone for good.
    Lvg nghtmare likes this.

  5. #5
    Beefaroni7272 is offline Advanced Member
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    Loved njotreading this!! Congratulations on 60 days ish. It keeps getting better!! So happy for you!!

    Beef
    Lvg nghtmare likes this.

  6. #6
    Mbrazile is offline New Member
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    Thank you very much.

    I am of the opinion that abruptly stopping is easier for some (including myself) than attempting to taper. The entire time you're tapering in preparation for stopping there is a whole lot of room to psych yourself up and develop intense anxiety about the whole thing. I think if someone had to withdraw but was unaware of what exactly was to come, it would be remarkably easier to endure.

  7. #7
    Beefaroni7272 is offline Advanced Member
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    I tapered to 1mg/ day and jumped. It wasn't pretty for a while, but after three weeks it started getting better every day. A few back tracks and hiccups here and there. But so much better than I could have ever hoped for. It's so nice not waking up and being held hostage by subs every day. This site helped me so much during my detox and it made me more determined to stay the course, that and I have an amazing support system at home. I did this for them, they make me want to be a better man, and I owe everything to them!

    Beef

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